Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have developed a graphene-based film that has a thermal conductivity capacity that is four times that of copper. This new technology makes it perfect for cooling electronics circuits and components in RF devices, LEDs, servers, and smartphones, to name a few.

This new technology makes it perfect for cooling electronics circuits and components in RF devices, LEDs, servers, and smartphones. Image credit: Chalmers University of TechnologyThis new technology makes it perfect for cooling electronics circuits and components in RF devices, LEDs, servers, and smartphones. Image credit: Chalmers University of TechnologyThe graphene film is attachable to electronic components made of silicon, which enhances the film's performance compared to typical graphene characteristics shown in previous, similar experiments.

Currently, many electronic systems get too hot, mainly because of the increasing demand on functionality. However, reducing and getting rid of excess heat in efficient ways is critical to prolonging electronic systems lifespan, and would greatly reduce energy usage.

"It has become evident that those methods cannot be used to rid electronic devices off great amounts of heat, because they have consisted only of a few layers of thermal conductive atoms,” says Johan Liu, professor at Chalmers University of Technology.

“When you try to add more layers of graphene, another problem arises, a problem with adhesiveness. After having increased the amount of layers, the graphene no longer will adhere to the surface since the adhesion is held together only by weak van der Waals bonds."

"We have now solved this problem by managing to create strong covalent bonds between the graphene film and the surface, which is an electronic component made of silicon," he says.

These stronger bonds are thanks to the addition of a property-altering molecule in graphene, which created silane bonds between the graphene and electronic component when heated.

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