Over the last decade, oil and gas production in the U.S. has dramatically increased due to hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling activities. Between 2010 and 2020, crude oil production more than doubled while natural gas production increased nearly 60%. This surge in production has driven a massive expansion of the network of infrastructure — including pipelines — that transports, refines and utilizes oil and natural gas.

There are over 3 million miles of regulated pipelines transporting natural gas, crude oil and other petroleum products in the U.S., with over 7,000 miles of new pipeline planned or under construction, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Over 100 new and proposed pipeline routes are now included in the Oil & Gas Watch database and interactive map maintained by the Environmental Integrity Project. The data highlight new and proposed pipelines and expansion projects, and complement data denoting other proposed and expanding oil, gas and petrochemical infrastructure projects that were approved since 2012.

Over 7,000 miles of new pipeline are planned or under construction in the U.S. Source: Environmental Integrity ProjectOver 7,000 miles of new pipeline are planned or under construction in the U.S. Source: Environmental Integrity Project

The system is now tracking over 600 projects; about 389 of these projects have been built over the last decade and are permitted to release over 126 million tons of greenhouse gases per year. An additional 374 projects have not yet been constructed, but have the potential to release nearly 199 million tons of greenhouse gases per year.

To contact the author of this article, email shimmelstein@globalspec.com