Metallic materials have long ruled as pressure piping materials of choice in the utility, oil and gas and other sectors, but thermoplastics and other nonmetallic options are emerging as challengers. Thinner and more flexible than metal pipe, plastic pipe materials are also corrosion-resistant, lightweight and easier to install.

To help engineers take advantage of these benefits, ASME has issued new standards for the design, specification and installation of plastic pressure piping: ASME NM.1, Standard on Thermoplastic Piping Systems; ASME NM.2, Standard on Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Thermosetting Resin Piping Systems; and ASME NM.3, Standard on Nonmetallic Materials

ASME NM.1 provides requirements for the design, materials, manufacturing, fabrication, installation, inspection, examination and testing of thermoplastic pressure piping systems. The standard addresses both pipe and piping components that are produced as standard products and custom products that are designed for a specific application.

ASME NM.2 provides requirements for the design, materials, manufacturing, fabrication, installation, inspection, examination and testing of glass-­fiber-reinforced thermosetting-resin (FRP) piping systems. The standard addresses both pipe and piping components that are produced as standard products and custom products that are designed for a speci­fic application. In addition, the standard allows for a variety of manufacturing methods of FRP pipe and piping components including, but not limited to, contact molding, compression molding, centrifugal casting and filament winding.

The NM.3 Standard provides specifications for nonmetallic materials (except wood, nonfibrous glass and concrete) and, in conformance with the requirements of the individual construction standards, methodologies, design values, limits and cautions on the use of materials. Similar to the function that Section II of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code serves for metallic materials, ASME NM.3 provides a central location for material specifications, allowable stress values and physical properties of non-metallic materials.

To contact the author of this article, email shimmelstein@globalspec.com